The Sacred Sprouts Schoolhouse

More of Zander’s Readers

Before I forget, I wanted to get down some more books that I’ve had Zander read this year. Since I’m unsure what direction I want to go with his readers for next year, I figure I better keep track. One, I want to keep track of his reading level, which is way higher than I’d thought. And two, I don’t want to accidentally hand him a repeat and then not have a back-up.

So in addition to the books listed previously, he’s also been handed:

  • Aesop’s Fables by Anna Millbourne
  • Rabbit Hill by Robert Lawson
  • The Land of The Dead AND The One-Eyed Giant by Mary Pope Osborne
  • The Borrowers by Mary Norton
  • The Search For Delicious by Natalie Babbit
  • The Magic School Bus, The Search For The Missing Bones
  • Geronimo Stilton, The Kingdom of Fantasy
  • Louis Braille by Margaret Davidson
  • One Of The Third Grade Thonkers by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
  • Owls In The Family by Farley Mowat
  • Jack Plank Tells Tales by Natalie Babbit
  • Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling
  • White Bird by Clyde Robert Bulla
  • The White Elephant by Sid Fleischman
  • Henry and Beezus by Beverly Cleary

 

We finally clicked on something with him. He’s read every book I’ve handed him without complaint, but a vast majority of them he would say “it’s not my favorite” when I asked what he thought at the end. He had asked me to read The Borrowers after he decided he didn’t care for The Littles. The Borrowers was not at all what he expected, and he said he wouldn’t read it again, and also wasn’t interested in seeing the new movie out.

The two Mary Pope Osborne books are adaptations of pieces of The Odyssey. Zander really enjoyed reading about Greek Myths, and sort of enjoyed these books, but as with anything else by this author, they really were fluff and twaddle, and he asked me not to get the remaining four from the series. I still have an eye out for more books from this genre though- I keep eyeing The Black Ships Before Troy (or something like that) and wondering if it would be too much.

Then I picked up The Search For Delicious from the libary and read it myself. I thought it was great, but definitely more difficult than anything he’d read before, and I wasn’t sure he wouldn’t lose interest. Well, not having anything else on hand, I handed it to him and he LOVED it. Loved it completely!

So now he’s reading Louis Braille this week, which is actually one of Abigail’s readers this year, and he’s already told me how awesome this book is. This week when we head to the library I’ll be taking along some book lists I’ve printed off with the reading level much more difficult than what I’ve been getting. I hope we can keep the hot streak going, because I think he’s finally reading for enjoyment, and not just because I tell him he has to read.

 

posted by Erika in Random Thoughts and have Comments (3)

3 comments

  1. Comment by jenn on March 22, 2012 at 8:56 am

    where do you get your reading lists?

  2. Comment by Erika on March 28, 2012 at 1:50 pm

    Well, I’m VERY, VERY picky about the books I will hand my kids to read. I’ve gotten a lot of great ideas off of http://www.classical-homeschooling.org/celoop/1000.html. Many of those books are out of print, unfortunately.

    For a leveled book list, I like http://home.comcast.net/~ngiansante/index.html, as it’s not affiliated with any particular publisher.

    Ambleside Online also has great book lists http://amblesideonline.org/index.shtml

    We try to read Living Books as much as possible- Newberry and Caldecott Award winners are almost always wonderful too. There is just way to much garbage and twaddle out there- books written to get kids reading, but they have no meat or substance to them. We try to avoid anything from Scholastic and pop culture type books too. I am after quality writing foremost, and secondly, I want thought provoking material- doesn’t have to be deep at all, but something that makes my kids think.

  3. Comment by Erika on March 28, 2012 at 2:12 pm

    I should also add that I am extremely picky about their reading books for school. Anything they pick up to read for fun is fine- I let them read whatever. But the school books should be thought-provoking and well-written.

    I find that their for-fun books are gravitating more towards my kind of books the more real books I hand them to read. Their tastes are improving.

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